Food Inequality

A Peacemaking Project by Cameron C.

What is the injustice we are solving?

When people are faced with food injustice, there are many other factors that can be set off by this one problem. Many people that we experience are either old aged, have a disability, do not have an education, or they are not employed. These factors can lead them to not having enough money to obtain a hot meal every day. Our group of young leaders does a lot of community work for our town and we also host free community dinners every month. Our goal is not to solve hunger, it is an effort to help these people get back on their feet with confidence and a full belly of food so that they can have a better life.

Comments:

Adrian B.
5 April 2018 15:10

Hi Cameron,

We wanted to let you know that we are extending the deadline for active projects to apply for a Mini-Grant during this Peace First Challenge to April 15th. You can apply for a mini-grant anytime, but meeting the Challenge deadlines will make you eligible for additional opportunities.

If you do not require a mini-grant to complete your project, you can remain eligible by completing your project and Reflection before the May 31st deadline! If you submit your project plan by April 15th, we'll be sure to provide you with feedback by April 21st to support you with carrying out the plan.

If you are still in early stages of planning, you are also welcome to apply for a mini-grant at a later date -- although you may not be eligible for some of our larger opportunities, the opportunity for funding and support is always there.

Please let me know if you have any questions, and if we can help in any way!

Best,
Adrian  

Adrian B.
22 February 2018 14:35

Hi Cameron!

Thanks so much for posting this project. Food justice is an important issue--your work literally can help save lives! I love that your group hosts community dinners and is thinking about practical ways you can support people experiencing hunger. You mentioned you do community work around town--what kinds of things do you do?

We like to encourage everyone to take a deep dive into understanding root causes--which will also support your educational work when you start working with others to increase their understanding. One thing that can help deepen your understanding of this issue is interviewing people who don't have healthy food, people who cause this injustice (who create the situation where people don't have healthy food), and people who are already working to end this injustice. Here are some resources for doing that: https://www.peacefirst.org/projects/test-project-3/dashboard/understand-injustice

And some organizations that work on food justice:
https://foodforward.org/2016/04/what-is-food-justice/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI0vmDrc2Z2QIVhq_ICh2IAgM3EAAYASAAEgIMRvD_BwE
https://civileats.com/category/food-and-policy/food-justice/
http://justfood.org/advocacy/what-is-food-justice
http://thefoodproject.org/about
http://thefoodtrust.org/uploads/media_items/access-to-healthy-food.original.pdf

It can also help to do some reading on your own--here are a few resources I found useful:
https://www.healthlibrary.com/book15_chapter156.htm
https://hellogiggles.com/lifestyle/health-fitness/many-americans-dont-access-healthy-food-massive-problem/
https://www.colorlines.com/articles/why-more-americans-cant-access-healthy-food
https://www.ucsusa.org/our-work/food-agriculture/solutions/expand-healthy-food-access#.Wn35zJM-fBI
https://grist.org/food/food-access-is-a-big-problem-for-many-native-nations-heres-how-one-community-is-fighting-back/
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/don-hinklebrown/access-to-healthy-food_b_4822735.html
https://www.cnn.com/2017/05/16/health/healthy-foods-confusion-study/index.html

You can also invite others to participate in this conversation right here on this question's page. There are a number of people/teams working on projects that address various aspects of food injustice. Here are a few you might want to connect with:
https://www.peacefirst.org/projects/project-food-thought
https://www.peacefirst.org/projects/kans-kidss-zavala-elementary-food-pantry
https://www.peacefirst.org/projects/millions-people-do-not-have-access-enough-food-eat
https://www.peacefirst.org/projects/showing-compassion-towards-1-4-children-are-food-insecure
https://www.peacefirst.org/projects/children-do-not-get-enough-food-eat-home
https://www.peacefirst.org/projects/food-injustice-low-quality-food-being-served-youth-all-time
https://www.peacefirst.org/projects/food-shortage-and-production-my-community
https://www.peacefirst.org/projects/jee-foods
https://www.peacefirst.org/projects/community-food-pantry

And some questions that go down similar trains of thought:
https://www.peacefirst.org/questions/can-there-be-incentive-program-encourage-people-buy-healthier-foods
https://www.peacefirst.org/questions/should-i-create-weekend-program-my-border-city-insure-children-go-home-food

I also wanted to let you know about an opportunity coming up soon. While you can create a project at any time to be eligible for a $250 mini-grant, if you submit your compassionate insight by February 28th, you can participate in the Peace First Challenge with other young people from around the country, and can apply to attend a spring Peace First Accelerator Conference!

I hope all this helps! Let me know if you have any questions, and if there are other ways we can support you. I’m excited to see where this project goes!

Best,
Adrian