A Victory for Women’s Soccer over Wage Discrimination

The U.S. women's soccer team after they won the 2015 World Cup championship. PHOTO CREDITS: Getty Images via Daily Mail

The U.S. women's soccer team after they won the 2015 World Cup championship. PHOTO CREDITS: Getty Images via Daily Mail

 

As we celebrated #EqualPayDay earlier this week, women’s soccer won a huge victory in the battle of equal pay for equal work. US Soccer agreed on a new deal to give the US women’s national team better pay and benefits. This comes after five star athletes filed a complaint last year of wage discrimination.

 

For those of you who somehow think the #USWNT "haven't earned it." #EqualPlay #EqualPay pic.twitter.com/pMk03ug3Mx

— Sam (@phasmasam) March 31, 2016

 

When interviewed by the NY Times, the goalkeeper Hope Solo said:

 

“The numbers speak for themselves. We are the best in the world, have three World Cup championships, four Olympic Championships [yet the men’s players] get paid more to just show up than we get paid to win major championships.”

 

As the defending World Cup champions, no one can argue that these women haven’t earned their fair share of pay. While the latest deal with US Soccer doesn’t guarantee equal pay compared to the US men’s national team, it makes great progress in paving the way towards that goal. Through changes in the pay structure as well as a major salary bump, bigger bonuses, and better travel/maternity benefits, female athletes on the soccer field are feeling empowered to reach equal pay sooner rather than later.

 

Shout out to all the women out there working their butts off for less! ????????‍????#equalpayday #ChangeTheGame

— Christen Press (@ChristenPress) April 4, 2017

 

Join a community of peacemakers and start your own gender equality project today to help fight gender discrimination.